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So what’s new?

There have been lots of changes to cycling infrastructure recently, mostly using post-Covid active transport legislation which does not have a prior consultation process. Some of the features below are permanent; others are temporary but may be replaced by permanent schemes.

Consultations are open until 31 October on the measures in Brighton Old Town, as well as the temporary cycle lanes on the Old Shoreham Road.

You can also write to your local ward councillors and members of the Council’s Environment, Transport and Sustainability Committee with feedback.

A270 Old Shoreham Road Temporary Cycle Lanes

These cycle lanes cover a 1.7 mile stretch from Carlton Terrace, Portslade, to The Drive, Hove, where they meet existing lanes that continue to Dyke Road, Brighton. Some of the 1.7 mile stretch has been reallocated from motor vehicle use; much is physically separated with plastic wands.

A259 Brighton-Hove Seafront Temporary Cycle Lane

This westbound-only lane will goes from West Street, Brighton, to Third Avenue, Hove, on space reallocated from parked and moving vehicles, while the corresponding stretch of the existing pavementside track has been converted to eastbound-only. The stretch from the Pier to West street has been removed, due to problems with buses. Please bear in mind the following:
 
  • Between the Pier and West Street (just after Shelter Hall), the cycle lane is two-way, as it as always been. At West Street, you will be guided to join the new on-road westbound cycle lane.
  • Traffic lights on the westbound cycle lane apply to the cycle lane in the same way as they do to the vehicle lanes.
  • There are several ‘floating’ vehicle bays between the cycle lane and vehicle lanes. Please take extra care around these as people may walk into the cycle lanes.

Old Town

Several restrictions have been made to reduce traffic, with pavement widening outside the Town Hall and on Ship Street. The southern and northern ends of Ship Street have been closed to motor vehicle traffic, with cycles permitted, although vehicles can still access it via Middle Street. The metal gate at the North Street end of Ship Street has been replaced by bollards, making cycle access easier. Take extra care on this part of Ship Street as restaurants now occupy a lot of road space and pedestrians and diners may be unaware of people approaching on cycles.

Valley Gardens

The new cycle track in Valley Gardens looks great. It’s well-surfaced and wide and the local environment has been radically improved with new planting. Since the government’s new guidance, this is the standard of infrastructure we should now be seeing across the UK.

Please take extra care on the old cycle tracks of The Level. Surfacing is poor and in places the pedestrian/cycling signs have almost entirely rubbed off, meaning that people may be unaware they’re walking on the cycle track.

Plans for the next stage of the Valley Gardens recevelopment (Phase 3) include new cycle tracks and the replacement of the Aquarium Roundabout with at T-junction. There’s a consultation on the next stage of the Valley Gardens development on the council website. You can have your say until 16 September.

 

A23 Preston Road

A temporary on-road cycle lane has been announced along the A23 from Dyke Road Drive to Argyle Road, which is part of National Cycle Network route NCN20, along with upgrades to pedestrian crossings. This scheme has been delayed until later this year – we don’t know exactly when it will implemented.

 

More to come

The council has bid for more emergency funding for further cycle lanes, including an extension to the Old Shoreham Road and seafront cycle lanes as far as the city boundaries, improvements to Western Road and London Road and a temporary cycle lane on Marine Parade. They’re still awaiting the outcome of this bid.

More to explore